CURRICULA

English Language Arts

Creative Writing (East & West)

In Creative Writing, students will explore the elements of numerous literary genres (short fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction, memoir, etc) and the power of both print and multimedia formats. To develop original writing pieces, students will engage in independent reading of model texts, writing workshops, revision workshops, and peer reviews/conferences. Students will be asked to engage in writing activities that require sharing one’s work and in publishing one’s writing beyond the classroom setting.

College, Career, and Community Writing (East)

In this course, students will diverge from a traditional literature-based ELA content course to focus on their professional and technical writing in real world application settings. The goals of this course include exposing students to different genres of writing that revolve around specific usages of standard English conventions to achieve their purpose. Students will begin with building their professional vocabulary through defining professional etiquette in writing and communication. They will then transition into practicing genre writing they may expect to participate in through the college application process and beyond. They will then transition to professional writing by building their portfolio of personal documents that they will be able to build on as they continue into whatever career path they choose. They will also be asked to research writing conventions in different career fields and present their findings to help appreciate how versatile written communication can be. Their final goals will be practicing community writing and writing for a community-based audience through individual and collaborative project-based assignments.

AP Literature (East)

The AP English Literature and Composition course will engage you in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, you can deepen your understanding of the ways writers use language to create meaning. You’ll learn to consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as smaller-scale elements such as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.

Writing Center (East)

This course provides students with an in-depth study of writing and tutoring pedagogy. Students prepare to be peer writing tutors through an intense examination of the rules of composition, critical reading, and analytical thinking about writing. Students are expected to refine and develop their own writing abilities through peer tutoring and reflection on their tutoring experiences. Starting in Q3, students will tutor on a weekly basis in the HCSS Writing Center

AP Language (East & West)

The AP course in English Language and Composition prepares students for college-level coursework. Students are expected to read closely, think analytically, and communicate clearly in both written and oral communication.

Students are engaged in becoming skilled readers of prose in a variety of rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their reading and writing make students aware of the interactions of writer’s purpose, audience expectation, and subject, as well as of the way genre conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.

ELA 12 (ELA IV)

In ELA 12, students will be given the opportunity to explore and analyze the use of language through a variety of texts and genres. Through a combination of writing exercises, class discussions, and collaborative group activities, students will develop a deeper understanding of theme, genre, audience, and author intent, and gain the necessary skills to think critically and communicate as writers, students, and members of society. We will be exploring the theme of identity throughout the year, as you prepare to leave high school and continue to explore what your identity means to you.

ELA 11 (ELA III)

In ELA III, we will be covering a wide variety of current events, issues, and social justice topics. Using the lens of literature, we will analyze texts, research information, and have respectful discussions. There will be readings from all types of texts such as short stories, articles, poems, and novels. Students will also be expected to write every day. There will be both informal and formal writing assignments that reflect the topic or text the class is focusing on. The goal of the class is to prepare students to engage with literature in a thoughtful and analytical way that prepares them for senior year, SATs, college essay writing, and post-graduation.

ELA 10 (ELA II)

In ELA II, students will be given the opportunity to explore and analyze the use of language through a variety of texts and genres. Through a combination of writing exercises, class discussions, and collaborative group activities, students will develop a deeper understanding of theme, genre, audience, and author intent, and gain the necessary skills to think critically and communicate as writers, students, and members of society. This course not only prepares students for the Language Arts MCAS in the spring, but it also aims to scaffold the critical thinking, close reading, and writing skills that will be necessary in their future academic careers.

ELA 9 (ELA I)

In this class, students will be presented with a variety of different texts, both in genre and topic to build a deeper appreciation for textual elements and details. Students are asked to read, respond and reflect on their readings to encourage a deeper relationship with texts and to build world awareness and empathy for the personalities telling the stories. This class will synthesize reading strategies with a variety of written responses that will include narrative writing, rhetorical writing, and research writing with additional opportunities for creative and poetic writing. In order to expand reading and writing skills, students will engage in class discussions, collaborative activities on and offline, and independent work. The goal of this class is to help students build a strong foundation for the expectations of ELA, and any future AP courses they may choose to take.

ELA 8

As the final year of middle school, ELA 8 is a pivotal year for ensuring students gain the literacy skills necessary to be successful in high school. This course focuses on taking the skills students have been practicing since 6th grade and increasing the rigor and complexity of the reading and writing tasks students will be asked to complete. With a special focus on building a love of reading, as well as writing stamina, students will read and write more than ever before. Students will also be asked to engage in a range of discussions surrounding real-world topics, working together to understand ideas in a learning community. The course will not only prepare students for the MCAS in the spring, but will also equip them with the ability to read, write, speak, and listen at a high school level.

ELA 6

This is a transitional year between elementary and secondary school. Students will focus on developing the literacy skills needed to read, understand and write both non-fiction and fiction texts, as well as grapple with literary elements like point of view, character development, and developing argument.

ELA 7

Seventh grade English Language Arts is a rigorous course designed to improve essential reading comprehension, writing, and critical thinking skills that will promote high school and college readiness. Students will use a variety of texts and genres to explore how authors develop the literary elements of character, point of view, setting, conflict, and theme within different genres.

Young Adult Literature (East)

This elective will focus on the genre of YA Lit, with engaging discussions, creative writing assignments, and analysis of the texts we will be reading throughout the year. Prepare to learn about genre, structure, common themes in YA Lit, and more!

Mythology, Folklore, and Legendary Tales (West)

In Mythology, Folklore, and Legendary Tales, we will be covering a wide variety of texts from around the world. Using the lens of literature, we will analyze texts, research information, and have respectful discussions. Students will be specifically tasked to grapple with the essential question: Why do human beings tell stories to make sense of the world? Students will learn about mythology, folklore, and legendary tales from cultures all over the world, discuss patterns, and conduct research about the stories that interest them most.